We Return to Eckert Estate Winery

EckertEntry
They say that absence makes the heart grow fonder. Not
sure about our hearts, but our palates were certainly yearning for a return to
the Eckert Estate Winery. When we tried to remember when we last visited we
were convinced that we missed an entire summer! What else could we do, but
return and see if they still remembered us?

Whew, of course Vickie remembered us! She and Mike have been hard at work all summer, decorating their new location.  Inside and out, their decorating has transformed
the space. Hopefully they have a long term lease, because they are making a
stark space into something warm and inviting.
We had been away so long that we missed their summer wine
release! Oh my, that’s pretty embarrassing. As usual, members were asked to
choose two out a release of three wines. This release featured a 2012 Viognier,
a 2011 Chardonnay, and a 2010 Pinot Noir.
Full disclosure, I am not a fan of the typical Chard. So
I tried the Eckert Chardonnay with some reservations. Wow! Not a typical Chard
at all. Very lightly buttered, probably because of its time in stainless steel.
This Chardonnay is crisp and fruit-forward, perfect with a spinach and
strawberry salad. Yes, one of these came home with us! There is a lot of space on the Chardonnay
shelf in the wine fridge, too.
We also loved the 2013 Viognier! A refreshingly clean
start with a hint of butter in the finish. Just a bit of mineral, nicely
balancing the fruit. Great pairing with an autumn chicken in lemon and caper
sauce. One of these came home, too.
Rounding out the trio was their 2010 Pinot Noir.  A bit tannic, with a very dry finish. Perfect
for watching Monday Night Football. Hint, hint.
Mike was getting his “mad scientist” on, so I couldn’t
contain my curiosity. As usual, he as gracious and stopped his work and
explained his project to me. It turns out that he was preparing a sterile
bottling station for his upcoming Semillon and Viognier bottling.
No Butter in Viognier!
I learned that the bacteria that produces malolactic  fermentation, delivering a wonderful buttery
note in Chardonnay, is the enemy of Semillon and Viognier. Mike explained that
the bacteria is everywhere in a winery, so extreme measures are required to
keep it out of the Semillon and Viognier.
Mike accomplished this feat by forcing the wine through
extremely fine filters (2 microns for you budding chemists out there) before
filling each bottle. Forcing liquids through fine filters is no easy task, so I
applaud Mike’s creative solution. I can’t wait to taste the fruits of his
labors. Sorry, couldn’t resist.

 


So have we mentioned the fun things we have up our sleeves for our wonderful subscribers? Join our wineless wine club! It’s free, you’ll learn of our new articles the day they’re published, and we will soon give you access to exclusive content. So go ahead, click here to SUBSCRIBE!